Science and the Shroud of Turin [Spitzer Scholarly Article]

Science and the Shroud of Turin [Spitzer Scholarly Article]

The Shroud of Turin is a burial shroud (a linen cloth woven in a 3-over 1 herringbone pattern) measuring 14 ft. 3 inches in length by 3 ft. 7 inches in width. It apparently covered a man who suffered the wounds of crucifixion in a way very similar to Jesus of Nazareth.

Notice the position of the blood stains—the bold brown color—in relation to the image of the body—the fainter sepia hue.

The cloth has a certifiable history from 1349 when it surfaced in Lirey, France in the hands of a French nobleman – Geoffrey de Charny. It also has a somewhat sketchy traceable history from Jerusalem to Lirey, France – through Edessa, Turkey and Constantinople.

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Read Also:

How Old is the Shroud of Turin? 1,970 years. (Give or take 200.)

What is the Shroud of Turin? Here's What Science Says.

Does the Shroud of Turin Match the Wounds of Christ?

 

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